Bouncing Back: Sage’s Volleyball Teams Return to Practice

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The girls’ volleyball teams practice outside instead of on the indoor courts.

Lauren Chung

Things are looking a bit different for Sage’s volleyball teams because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but players are feeling great to be out playing again.

Volleyball is an inclusive, cooperative sport for players, but when it comes to COVID-19, the sport becomes complicated because of the pandemic guidelines.

“Practice looks quite a bit different from last year since there are no 2-on-2, 4-on-4, or 6-on-6 games going on at practice, which are very common in our typical practices,” said Coach Dan Thomassen, head coach of the girls’ volleyball team. 

While in distance learning, players practice at home with workouts and drills over Zoom calls. On campus, players are split into two groups to maximize safety and follow social distancing guidelines when playing. Practice is run outside on the grass, and every player is assigned one ball that only they are allowed to touch, practicing their skills by themselves. As they are restricted to touching and playing with only one ball and are not allowed to touch their teammate’s balls, this makes playing difficult because of the limitations.

“I think the volleyball community has worked really hard to make it as close to normal as possible. I love practice even though it is on the grass or on Zoom calls,” said sophomore Noe Lee.

Regarding the CIF athletics competitions as well as other games and competitions, all competitions are postponed until further notice. 

“I am unable to say what will happen, in terms of competition, but I am hopeful that the team can compete in some games this year if possible. We are preparing as if there is competition coming up, but I am sure that there will be adjustments that need to be made,” said Coach Justin Johnson, head coach of the boys’ volleyball team.

“It is hard to imagine having any games until COVID-19 is eradicated entirely in Orange County,” said sophomore Carter Bryant. “But we still look at this year as an opportunity to get better in any way we can, and that’s what we’ll do.”